Seventh-day Adventist Church

Seventh-day Adventist Church

Classification

Protestant

Orientation

Adventist

Polity

Modified presbyterian polity

Geographical area

Worldwide, but esp. Central and South America, and Africa

Founder

Joseph Bates, James White, Ellen G. White, J. N. Andrews

Origin

May 23, 1863

Battle Creek, Michigan

Branched from

Millerites

Separations

Seventh Day Adventist Reform Movement (separated 1925); Davidian SDAs (separated 1929)

Congregations

61,818 Churches, 61,361 Companies[1]

Members

17 million[2]

Ministers

15,813[1]

Hospitals

168[1]

Nursing homes

138[1]

Aid organization

Adventist Development and Relief Agency

Primary schools

5,666[1]

Secondary schools

1,470[1]

Tertiary institutions

106[1]

The Seventh-day Adventist Church (commonly abbreviated “Adventist[3]) is a Christian denomination which is distinguished by its observance of Saturday,[4] the original seventh day of the Judeo-Christian week, as the Sabbath, and by its emphasis on the imminent second coming of Jesus Christ. It is the eighth largest international body of Christians[5]. The denomination grew out of the Millerite movement in the United States during the middle part of the 19th century and was formally established in 1863.[6][7] Among its founders was Ellen G. White, whose extensive writings are still held in high regard by Seventh-day Adventists today.

From: Wikipedia



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